Countess Markievicz

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Constance Markievicz and her sister Eva Gore-Booth

Constance Gore-Booth, who would later become the Countess Markievicz was of planter stock and from an English noble family.  With her background, she was an unlikely candidate to become one of the leaders of the Rising.[1]  The Countess was a lieutenant and sentenced to penal servitude for her participation in the rising.[2]  She converted from Protestantism to Catholicism.[3]  The Countess was one of the leading members and founded with Bulmer Hobson (an IRB, Gaelic Athletic Association Sinn Féin activist), Na Fianna Éireann.  She had an ascendancy background which was unconventional for Republicans.  She was a mother to the Fianna Boys; she regularly showed her affection when she was missing or spoiling them.[4]

Fianna Éireann scouts with Countess Markievicz.

She urged the Irish boy scout movement with Fianna Fireann, a military organization.  The boy scouts were taught scouting and shooting.  Many boys were always at the countesses’ house studying and playing.[5]  She trained the boys in Fianna.  The boys were capable of holding a building and proved to do so for three days.  The Countess instructed them every Sunday.  She sincerely cared about the boys.  The Countess was the first to put Margaret Skinnider into boy’s clothes.  The Countess never knew what guests she had, they would climb in through the windows.  She would sell jewels for the republic cause and was fearless.  She also fed refugees and sister activists.[6]

Countess Markievicz in uniform.

The Countess Markievicz was the only woman that held a position of command.[7]  In jail, the Countess was ridiculed by Dublin Fusiliers.  They were lenient on the Countess.[8]  She arrived at the Kilmainham jail in uniform.[9]  The Countess was the only woman to be court-martialed, her life was probably spared because she was a woman.[10]  The Countess was one of a number of women who participated in the Easter Rising.

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Skinnider, Margaret. 2016. Doing My Bit For Ireland (Illustrated Edition). S.l.: Echo Library. 10.

[2] Skinnider, 2016. 57.

[3] McGarry, 161.

[4] McGarry, Fearghal. 2017. The Rising: Ireland: Easter 1916. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 30.

[5] Skinnider, 2016. 12.

[6] Skinnider, 2016. 11.

[7] McGarry, 164.

[8] McGarry, 259.

[9] McGarry, 261.

[10] McGarry, 270.

 

 

 

Bibliography

Primary Sources

Skinnider, Margaret. 2016. Doing My Bit For Ireland (Illustrated Edition). S.l.: Echo Library.

 

Secondary Sources

McGarry, Fearghal. 2017. The Rising: Ireland: Easter 1916. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wills, Clair. Dublin 1916 – the Siege of the Gpo. London: Profile Books, 2010.

 

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